Homemade sidecar breaks world records

kevin clemens sidecar

Published on 8 September 2016 by Robert Drane

While Guy Martin revs it out to break the two-wheeled land speed record, one man is adding records to his name in his homemade electric sidecar.

Kevin Clemens is no stranger to setting world records.

In 2011, Kevin set a national record at the Bonneville Salt Flats with a customised electric bike – an old Honda frame and some parts from Ebay. One year later, he used the frame of a Kawasaki Ninja with a “much more sophisticated motor and drive train system”, taking home four world land speed records and breaking the 100mph barrier.

This year, he has electrified a sidecar built for British racer Tony Baker. Its original engine has been stripped out, replaced by two liquid-cooled motors and an assortment of batteries.


Read more: 55 million electric motorcycles to be sold by 2024


Kevin’s attempt this week gained him four world FIM records and one US national record (all subject to ratification) for electric sidecars including:

  • Flying Mile: partially streamlined electric sidecar over 300Kg
  • Flying Kilometer: partially streamlined electric sidecar over 300Kg
  • Flying Mile: unstreamlined electric sidecar over 300Kg
  • Flying Kilometer: unstreamlined electric sidecar over 300Kg
  • US AMA National record: Electric sidecar over 300kg

The inspiration to ride sidecar came from Kevin’s attention to detail and determination to achieve maximum speed. As an engineer at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand studying a Ph.D in aerodynamics, he realised that a sidecar can produce an aerodynamic shape which reduces more drag forces than a usual bike.

Originally, Kevin’s son was passenger however, when he discovered that the rules allowed for 60kg of lead ballast to replace him, metal was used to produce a more streamlined design.

Watch the video below to find out more about the record-breaking sidecar attempt:

Find out more on Facebook or at Kevin’s website.


Click here: 6 of the best electric motorcycles you should try in 2016